01 December 2008

Scoliosis


I couldn't get all the pink out of J's hair, he now looks like a strawberry blonde with extra berry :) I did discover that bending over the tub to wash his hair was the perfect position for my back to lock up. I have scoliosis and bending over is an instant reminder of it.

Oddly, I thought my back pain was caused by the time I helped my ex get the car engine out of the basement. We have no garage here so he stored the engine in the basement. When he decided it was time to move it out I did a little dance of joy and then went to help him get it out. In the process I grabbed the engine and while being bent over, I yanked upwards. I thought I'd injured my sacrum doing that. It was at a family gathering where I was talking about my bad back that my mom said I'd been diagnosed with scoliosis in grade five. It was never treated because it wasn't all that bad. Huh. I sort of knew about that but thought I made it up to be special or something. I don't recall ever discussing it with my doctor, school nurse, or my mom. I may have, I just don't remember.

Anyway, I find it bothers me when I try to sleep too long. Like longer than 8 hours. I thought I just needed a better mattress so S and I bought one last year. It didn't help. Comfy though :) And as much as S likes to just lie in bed and read or rest, I absolutely cannot do that. I must get moving as soon as possible after waking up. And if I sleep more than about 9 hours the pain radiates into my pelvis as well as the sacrum, making it difficult to stand upright.

At work I avoid bending over the Hobart bowls as much as possible because of all this. One of the things I used to do to help out was put the streusel on top of one pie. First I'd have to bend over the Hobart and rub the hot streusel between my hands to get the lumps out. Then I'd have to scoop it out and drop it on the pie. I could do this for less than a minute before I had to grab the edges of the bowl and wait for my sacrum to loosen up enough to straighten up. And I have zero use of my legs while I'm locked up because my legs are controlled by my sacrum. I don't help with that anymore.

I did talk to my doctor about the scoliosis not that long ago. She agreed that it isn't bad enough to have a brace. When I asked what to do to make it better she said to strengthen the muscles. And she said if something hurts then stop doing that. I'm pretty good about not doing things that hurt so I was ahead of her on that one :) I do wonder how it will impact my life later on. I want to live to be 100, but I really want it to be a mobile and active 100.

4 comments:

Chantelle said...

I also have scoliosis in my upper back between my shoulder blades.

I have severe pain in my sacrum as well - not where I have degeneration, but lower - and I think the reason my left hamstring hurts is related to that pain.

Sigh. Getting older sucks. I'd like the body I had (and abused) when I was 21 or 25, please.

Hugs and love,
Chantlele

Anonymous said...

Hello

I really enjoyed reading your Blog. Recently I have been diagnosed with scoliosis, so I spend most of my free time researching and trying to find information on the internet. In my search I found http://www.scoliosisspecialists.com and they have introduced me to the world of SpineCor.. a flexible soft scoliosis brace.. I was so relief that I did not have to wear the hard rigid braces and I wear SpineCor under my clothes and no one even knows I have it on.. anyways, I look forward to all the updates. Thanks again,

Jessica

Dr Stitzel said...

Genetic Pre-disposition + Environmental Influences = Idiopathic Scoliosis

Metaphorically, it could be described in terms of toothpaste being squeezed out of a tube.(Pictured below) The genetic pre-disposition would be the equivalent of how tightly the cap is screwed on; The environmental influence is how hard the hand is squeezing the tube; and the amount of toothpaste being ejected out of the tube is the resulting combination of both the cap tightness and the pressure from the squeezing hand.

Armed with this basic understanding of scoliosis of spine, it is readily apparent that one must alter either the patients genetic pre-disposition and/or eliminate the environmental influences prior the curvature becoming progressive and bio-mechanically driven.

Find out more about environmental risk factors at http://www.treatingscoliosis.com

Dr Stitzel said...

Genetic Pre-disposition + Environmental Influences = Idiopathic Scoliosis

Metaphorically, it could be described in terms of toothpaste being squeezed out of a tube.(Pictured below) The genetic pre-disposition would be the equivalent of how tightly the cap is screwed on; The environmental influence is how hard the hand is squeezing the tube; and the amount of toothpaste being ejected out of the tube is the resulting combination of both the cap tightness and the pressure from the squeezing hand.

Armed with this basic understanding of scoliosis of spine, it is readily apparent that one must alter either the patients genetic pre-disposition and/or eliminate the environmental influences prior the curvature becoming progressive and bio-mechanically driven.

Find out more about environmental risk factors at http://www.treatingscoliosis.com